Friday, August 07, 2009

View From the (Sock) Summit

This blog entry has been started and stopped so many times I've stopped counting. SO here's what I am going to do. You get some (few, really) pictures and blurbs and very brief bits. This thing, this Sock Summit thing? Indescribable on so many levels that I can't get words out. That and I am running on low sleep levels so words are nearly impossible at this point to form in my head let alone type. Therefore, without further ado I present an overview of the first few days of Sock Summit 2009:The Convention Center. Really a cool one, probably the coolest in the US. Very green, which makes me happy, lots of recycling, composting and - my favorite - low flush toilets!!Green landscaping. It's a huge log cut into cross sections and either planted or allowed to naturalize with local fauna. Lovely, and looks a bit like my backyard, only prettied up. And without deer and foxes.My first class at Sock Summit, none of whom died, all of whom made socks (YAY, CLASS!!) You'll see my second class in the next post, where we'll also delve into "market" a bit.For those of you who find my 2-at-a-Time Socks thing to be a bit mad, check this. Seven pair. Fourteen socks. At once. A man after my own heart, AND using my favorite needles. You can follow his progress on the Skacel blog. I was thinking that I could do this myself in time for Christmas gift giving. Opinions?!
Once upon a time there was a little girl called Meg - not my Meg, but a different one. Elizabeth's Meg. When Meg was a teenager she had these lovely arch shaped stockings that she wore (with garters, I might add). Meg, growing up with wool all around, only knew that she had some lovely warm stockings. Her 'Ma' knitted all the time. One stocking more or less is no big deal, right?
In time Meg came to appreciate these stockings as more than just a cozy place to pop one's shivering toes. Imagine putting on your well-loved socks and suddenly realizing that you're wearing something truly astonishing; a work of both art and science created by a woman who's brain many of us would love to be inside of for even a minute (just before we popped into the brain of Cat Bordhi for a little look around). Then try to imagine that you are generous enough to share not just the concept for creating these socks, and a pattern for those inclined to need one, but also a once in a lifetime opportunity for little upstart 2-at-a-Time Sock authors to not only touch and hold those stockings...
but put them on. Wear them. Knitted by your Ma; gone now but beloved by so very many. Not in an archive, not hidden away in a drawer, not pressed beneath glass and preserved. Allowed, with a love of the craft and generosity your mother would appreciate, to be revered by the people who's lives were and are so touched by her talent and skill.Either I have small feet, or Meg has big ones. Just saying.Meg Swansen is charming, disarming, open and warm. Also brilliant and technically gifted but with an acute awareness of the presence of neither right nor wrong in this craft. This was my fan-girl moment and for so very many reasons.
This is Raveler Ceels who also has a blog, and cats. She's from Australia. She's just been told who knitted this stocking.There was a lot of that sort of thing. It's nice to share one's knitterly geek-ness with others.
Knitters set a record, and we're hoping Guinness agrees...Impressive, and truly wonderful to be a part of.
There was a book signing during which I got to meet some lovely folks, like Robyn, who not only knitted these little beauties but shared one with me. This made me very happy.Cunning little hat. And this is Ann who's knitting up a pair of provisionally cast on Sugar Maples in the loveliest color. It's like cranberry jelly, with the whole berries.Mmmm!
And here on the left we have Megan who was wandering through the signing lines carrying her wedding veil and asking each of us to knit a bit on it. Honored to be a part of this project, and reluctant to hand it back frankly. Unfortunately I was so stunned by the beauty of the thing that I sort of ignored poor Ellie on the right there, who just wanted a book signed.I've said it before and I will say it again - I do not have A.D....D....what was I saying? Sorry. I saw a leaf drift by and...
You get my drift? I am about as focused as an eight year old boy most of the time.
This is a seriously brief update, in no way a full version - maybe on the way home I can write a bit more and post from the road. There is so very much to say, and I feel so very much honored to be part of this event. Grateful to Stephanie and Tina and the whole Sock Summit crew, the students who were stellar in both sessions; dedicated to their learning, bright and alert. There is something in the air here, something big and warm and magic.

6 comments:

lpitt said...

My biggest regret was giving up your class because, as a left handed "klutz" I was too intimidated. Everyone has said what an incredible teacher you are. Maybe I'll have another chance one of these days.
The rest of Sock Summit was inspiring. (And Meg Swansen served me cake. How cool is that?)

booksNyarn said...

Cannot wait for more details - seems like a wonderful time. Someday...

mary alice said...

your foot touched the sock that touched the hand.... OMG!!

~margaret from NH said...

It was wonderful to meet you, Melissa! And thank you for signing my book-can't wait to show it to Judy! Yes, Sock Summit was incredibly awesome and I feel so lucky to have been there to witness it all.

MadMad said...

Aw... yay! I was so happy to hear it went well! Wish I coulda gone!

Cynthia said...

Loved your class - I was in your Thursday session and had a great time. I'm down to the gussets on my first full-sized pair of two-at-a-time socks using your Twilight pattern with some Socks-that-Rock yarn I picked up at the Summit.

I enjoyed meeting you. Thank you so much for the class and for signing my book.